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Fibonacci Pop Apple
Fibonacci Pop Apple
Fibonacci Pop Apple
Fibonacci Pop Apple
Fibonacci Pop Apple

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Fibonacci Pop Apple

£ 198.00 GBP

Turing's Fibonacci Pop Apple* - Alan Turing Portrait

Limited Editions: Pop Art Alan Turing portrait with Fibonacci Apple as homage to 'The Son of Man' Magritte painting, with reference to his work and his possible cause of death (see below)*

In geometry, a golden spiral is a logarithmic spiral whose growth factor is φ, the golden ratio. That is, a golden spiral gets wider (or further from its origin) by a factor of φ for every quarter turn it makes.**

All print orders are produced by The Printspace: award winning, fine-art printers based in Shoreditch, London E2. The finished artwork is printed on demand, and despatched within 48 hours to anywhere in the world.
The Printspace,
74 Kingsland Rd
London E2 8DL

Limited Editions Information HERE

Delivery Information HERE

Framing Information HERE

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* On 8 June 1954, Turing's housekeeper found him dead. He had died the previous day. A post-mortem examination established that the cause of death was cyanide poisoning. When his body was discovered, an apple lay half-eaten beside his bed, and although the apple was not tested for cyanide, it was speculated that this was the means by which a fatal dose was consumed. An inquest determined that he had committed suicide, and he was cremated at Woking Crematorium on 12 June 1954.
Turing's ashes were scattered there, just as his father's had been. Andrew Hodges and another biographer, David Leavitt, have both suggested that Turing was re-enacting a scene from the Walt Disney film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), his favourite fairy tale, both noting that (in Leavitt's words) he took "an especially keen pleasure in the scene where the Wicked Queen immerses her apple in the poisonous brew"

Philosophy professor Jack Copeland has questioned various aspects of the coroner's historical verdict. He suggests an alternative explanation for the cause of Turing's death, this being the accidental inhalation of cyanide fumes from an apparatus for gold electroplating spoons, which uses potassium cyanide to dissolve the gold. Turing had such an apparatus set up in his tiny spare room. Copeland notes that the autopsy findings were more consistent with inhalation than with ingestion of the poison. Turing also habitually ate an apple before bed, and it was not unusual for it to be discarded half-eaten. In addition, Turing had reportedly borne his legal setbacks and hormone treatment (which had been discontinued a year previously) "with good humour" and had shown no sign of despondency prior to his death, setting down, in fact, a list of tasks he intended to complete upon return to his office after the holiday weekend.
At the time, Turing's mother believed that the ingestion was accidental, resulting from her son's careless storage of laboratory chemicals. Biographer Andrew Hodges suggests that Turing may have arranged the cyanide experiment deliberately, to give his mother some plausible deniability.

**Approximate logarithmic spirals can occur in nature (for example, the arms of spiral galaxies or phyllotaxis of leaves); golden spirals are one special case of these logarithmic spirals. A recent analysis of spirals observed in mouse corneal epithelial cells indicated that some can be characterised by the golden spiral, and some by other spirals It is sometimes stated that spiral galaxies and nautilus shells get wider in the pattern of a golden spiral, and hence are related to both φ and the Fibonacci series. In truth, spiral galaxies and nautilus shells (and many mollusk shells) exhibit logarithmic spiral growth, but at a variety of angles usually distinctly different from that of the golden spiral. This pattern allows the organism to grow without changing shape.

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